How To Prepare Your Snowblower For Winter

Don't be taken aback by the season's first snowfall anymore. With our expert advice, your snow blower will be ready to go.

Before you begin, park your snowblower on a level surface, remove the key, and unplug the spark plug wire. Check that it works by starting it up. If it is slow to start or not starting, the likely culprit is old fuel. So follow the below given steps to prepare your snowblower for winter

How To Prepare Snowblower For Winter

Steps to Get Your Snow Blower Ready for Winter:

Step 1: Drain the Fuel

Drain any remaining fuel from the previous year's tank. When working with gasoline, exercise extreme caution. Working in a well-ventilated area free of open flames or sparks is recommended.

A constant supply of fresh, clean fuel is required. When old gas sits in the fuel tank or your gas can for an extended period, it absorbs moisture. Gas will go bad in about 6 months unless you use a fuel stabilizer. Dirty gas can jam up your tank's fuel filter, so inspect it and swap it if it is old or blocked up.

Step 2: Inspect the Fuel Line

While you're in there, inspect the fuel line to ensure there are no cracks and that it remains flexible and soft. If the fuel line is cracked or broken, it must be replaced.

Step 3: Replace the Spark Plug

Spark plugs should be replaced once a season as well. So, if you know your spark plug is from the previous year, you should probably replace it.

Step 4: Change the Engine Oil

Let us now discuss oil. Oil lubricates engine components and aids in-cylinder cooling. Another thing you'll want to change once a season is oil. Don't forget to bring your used oil to your local oil recycling center!

Step 5: Lubricate the Moving Parts

Following that, we will lubricate the auger shaft and bearings to prevent the auger from freezing in the dead of winter. Take out all of the shear pins from the auger shaft. Spray a thin layer of silicone lubricant inside the shaft, as well as around the spacers and flange bearings.


Examine the shear pins for wear or damage and replace them as needed. Replace the shear pins and re-secure them with cotter pins.

Step 6: Check the Wheels

Let's take a look at your wheels and tires now. Tilt the snowblower carefully on its nose. Check that your fuel tank is empty. To remove the first wheel, use a socket wrench.


To keep the axle from rusting, clean it and coat it with multi-purpose automotive grease. Replace the wheel and secure it to the axle. Duplicate the procedure on the opposite wheel.

Step 7: Check the Air Pressure

Now we will check the air pressure in each tire with a pressure gauge. To check the pressure, press the gauge down on the valve stem and compare it to the recommended psi found on the tire sidewall. Tires should be inflated or deflated as needed.

Step 8: Inspect the Skid Shoes

Now we will check the air pressure in each tire with a pressure gauge. To check the pressure, press the gauge down on the valve stem and compare it to the recommended psi found on the tire sidewall. Tires should be inflated or deflated as needed.

Conclusion

Now that you've oiled, greased, and reassembled your snowblower, it's time to fill it up with fresh, clean gas and test it out. Spray silicone or WD-40 on your blower's chute to aid in snow removal. This will help prevent wet, heavy snow from caking up and may even increase the distance your blower can throw.

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About the Author

Tim

I am Tim, a weather enthusiast who loves to watch hurricanes and all other harsh weather conditions. I studied B.Sc(Meteorology) at the University of Miami. With excellent knowledge of Weather Forecasting, Meteorology, and Environmental Science, I am currently working in San Francisco as a Meteorologist. Also, I am a member of The Weather Channel and AccuWeather. In this blog, I will write a detailed review of Weather instruments that you need for survival and other activities.